Time May Change Me, But I Can’t Trace Time

What does it say that my last post was in remembrance of Lou Reed?

And just a few posts before that was my tribute to Captain Beefheart.

I suppose the only thing that dusts off the Creeter QWERTY is an influential musician passing through to the starry expanse.

And, glory-be, David Bowie was as influential as they come.

Announcement of his death on January 10th left me so thunderstruck that I had no words for several days. I sat by and read friend after friend pour out their hearts and tears. I read article after article praise his career and character. All I could do was passively click “Like” and silently weep.

No, that’s not all I could do. I also cranked up the volume.

Hunky Dory (1971) is, by my standards, one of the top 10 albums of all time. It’s hard to choose a best David Bowie album, it’s true, but Hunky Dory just takes it all to the next level for me.

Everything from his deliciously passionate vocals, to the wide range in music style honoring his favorite musicians, to the ever-present message that it’s not only okay to be an outsider – it’s good, it’s healthy, it’s necessary. You, in being abnormal, are normal. Love yourself. You are the future.

One of my favorite tracks is the song Bowie wrote upon receiving news he would become a father. “Kooks” is so simple and beautiful; the perfect song from a parent to child. I cannot wait for my husband and I to sing it to our baby when we have one.

I suppose it really is fitting that Lou Reed brought me back last time, and David Bowie brings me back now. This time I plan to stick around for a while.

Let’s take you out on a track from Hunky Dory that Bowie wrote for Lou Reed. In fact, the two of them performed it together on stage for Bowie’s 50th Birthday Bash in 1997.

Goodnight,

-Rachel

You Know, Her Life Was Saved By Rock & Roll

Lou Reed passed away today. He had a liver transplant earlier in the year, and I was so relieved to read an article where his wife, performance artist Laurie Anderson, said he was recovering nicely. Not only was I worried about Lou Reed’s own health, but the thought of the two of them being separated broke my heart.

Lou and Laurie

Lou and Laurie had been an influence on me with their individual careers, long before I even knew about their long-term relationship. But since their marriage in 2008, when I learned that they had been together since the 1990s, I have always been filled with immense love and hope just thinking about the fact that they were a couple. Two amazingly talented and perceptive people, who may not go by other people’s standards of “normal,” but are beautifully intertwined by their confidence in and respect for themselves and each other.

While I am saddened by this great loss, I am encouraged by the thought that there even existed an artist and human being who could be such a profound influence on the world, and this very Creeter.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m gonna start dancing to that fine, fine music.

-Rachel Creeter